CORE Capstone

(Majors only. Enrollment in CORE Capstone courses will be subject to departmental guidelines.)
(CORE CODE: CS)

The CORE Capstone is an option only if your major has a CORE Capstone course. Courses MUST be selected from courses coded as meeting CORE Capstone requirements at Testudo.

Course Number
Course Title
AMSC 420
Mathematical Modeling (also as MATH420)
AMST 450 Seminar in American Studies
ANSC 420
Animal Production Systems
BCHM 465
Biochemistry III
BIOE 486
Capstone Design II
BMGT 457
Marketing Policies and Strategies
BMGT 495
Business Policies
BSCI 417
Microbial Pathogenesis
BSCI 426
Membrane Biophysics
BSCI 464
Microbial Ecology
CHEM 399
Introduction to Chemical Research (MUST BE TAKEN FOR AT LEAST 3 CREDITS)
CHEM 491
Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM 492
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
CMSC 412
Operating Systems
CMSC 424
Database Design
CMSC 435
Software Engineering
DANC 485
Seminar in Dance
EDSP 490
Capstone Seminar in Special Education
ENAE 482
Aeronautical Systems Design
ENAE 484
Space Systems Design
ENCE 466
Design of Civil Engineering Systems
ENCH 446
Process Engineering Economics and Design II
ENME 472
Integrated Product and Process Development II
ENSP 400
Capstone in Environmental Science and Policy
ENST 470 Natural Resources Management
GEOL 394
Research Problems in Geology
HIST 309_
Proseminar in Historical Writing (Topics will vary)
HIST 396
Honors Colloquium II
HIST 408_
Senior Seminar (Topics will vary)
KNES 497
Independent Studies Seminar
LARC 471
Capstone Studio: Community Design
MATH 420
Mathematical Modeling (also as AMSC 420)
NFSC 422
Food Product Research and Development
NFSC 491
Issues and Problems in Dietetics
PHIL 426
Twentieth Century Analytic Philosophy
PHYS 428
Physics Capstone Research
PLSC460
Application of Knowledge in Plant Sciences

 

 

Current as of: 06/2013

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CORE Planning and Implementation
Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies
2110 Marie Mount Hall
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742
Last modified Wednesday, May 21, 2014
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